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HomeArabic English Learning NovelsPride and Prejudice : English and Arabic : Facing Page Format (Jane Austen)
Pride and Prejudice : English and Arabic : Facing Page Format (Jane Austen)
Pride and Prejudice : English and Arabic : Facing Page Format (Jane Austen)Pride and Prejudice : English and Arabic : Facing Page Format (Jane Austen)Pride and Prejudice : English and Arabic : Facing Page Format (Jane Austen)Pride and Prejudice : English and Arabic : Facing Page Format (Jane Austen)Pride and Prejudice : English and Arabic : Facing Page Format (Jane Austen)Pride and Prejudice : English and Arabic : Facing Page Format (Jane Austen)Pride and Prejudice : English and Arabic : Facing Page Format (Jane Austen)Pride and Prejudice : English and Arabic : Facing Page Format (Jane Austen)

Pride and Prejudice : English and Arabic : Facing Page Format (Jane Austen)

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ISBN: None
Author: Jane Austen
Publisher: Dar al Bihar (2005)
Pages: 537 Binding: Paperback

Description from the publisher:

Bilingual English-Arabic version of Jane Austen’s famous “Pride and Prejudice”.

Dual language books. The English and Arabic pages are facing each other, matching one-on-one with English on the left page, Arabic on the right page. Easy reference for individuals not strong in one of the languages. Well known fiction titles for different interests and levels.

Description of Book:

Elizabeth Bennet, one of the five daughters of a country gentleman in 19th-century Hertfordshire, England, faces a dilemma in her future – as their father's property is entailed to a male heir upon his death, they will be turned out of their house and left to fend for themselves unless she and her sisters can find advantageous husbands, something which consumes her mother. An opportunity arrives in the form of Mr. Bingley, a wealthy young gentleman who takes a country estate near to the Bennet's home, accompanied by his sisters and his good friend Fitzwilliam Darcy. Whereas Bingley is well-liked in the community, Darcy begins his acquaintance with Elizabeth, her family, and their neighbours with smug condescension and proud distaste for all of the country people; despite Mrs. Bennet's embarrassing interference Mr. Bingley and Jane begin to grow closer. Elizabeth, stung by Darcy's haughty rejection of her at a local dance, makes it a point to match his coldness with her own venom. When the militia arrive in the town, earning the admiration of Elizabeth's flighty and immature younger sisters, Elizabeth begins a friendship with Mr. Wickham, a charming soldier with a prior acquaintance with Darcy. Upon hearing Wickham's story of his misfortune at the hands of Mr. Darcy, Elizabeth immediately seizes upon it as another, more concrete reason to hate Mr. Darcy. Unbeknown to her, Darcy finds himself gradually drawn to Elizabeth. When Bingley leaves the countryside suddenly and makes no attempts to contact Jane any more, the young woman is heartbroken. Elizabeth, having previously thought well of Bingley, believes that there is something amiss in the way that he abandoned Jane and suspects Darcy's involvement. She is also approached by her cousin, the foolish and pompous clergyman Mr. Collins, who offers marriage to her; despite the fact that Collins is the male heir who will inherit her father's property upon his death, Elizabeth is unwilling to subject herself to a union that she knows will be unhappy for her and refuses him, much to her mother's distress. Collins subsequently marries Elizabeth's friend Charlotte Lucas, who invites Elizabeth to stay with them. Collins' parish is adjacent to Rosings Park, the grand manor of Darcy's aunt Lady Catherine de Bourgh, whom Collins is greatly obsequious towards; as a result, Elizabeth is frequently invited to Rosings, where she is again forced into contact with Darcy, who is visiting his aunt at the time. During this time, Elizabeth learns that Darcy indeed played a part in separating Bingley and Jane. Elizabeth is shocked when Darcy admits his love for her and proposes marriage. Insulted by his high-handed and insulting manner of proposal, Elizabeth refuses him, confronting him with his sabotage of Bingley's relationship with Jane and Wickham's account of their dealings. Shocked by Elizabeth's vehemence towards him, Darcy writes her a letter justifying his actions and revealing that Wickham in fact cheated him, and attempted to seduce his younger sister Georgiana in the process. He also justifies his actions towards Bingley and Jane with the defence that Jane did not visibly show any interest in his friend, whom he was attempting to protect from both heartache and a disadvantageous association with Elizabeth's embarrassing and uncouth mother and younger sisters; Elizabeth is prompted to question both her family's behaviour and Wickham's credibility, and comes to the conclusion that Wickham is not as trustworthy as his easy manners would indicate and her early impressions of Darcy may not have been accurate. During a tour of Derbyshire with her aunt and uncle, Elizabeth visits Pemberley, Darcy's grand estate, and presented with a more flattering, benevolent impression of his character from the locals who know him. When the party encounters Darcy as they tour the grounds of Pemberley, he makes an effort to behave in a gracious and welcoming manner towards them, thus strengthening Elizabeth's esteem of him. Elizabeth and Darcy's renewed acquaintance is threatened when news arrives that Wickham and Elizabeth's reckless younger sister Lydia have eloped, thus threatening the family's reputation and the Bennet sisters with ruin. Lydia and Wickham are soon found and married, delighting Mrs. Bennet. Elizabeth is surprised to learn from Lydia that Mr. Darcy was secretly responsible for both finding the couple and arranging their marriage at great expense to himself. Soon after, Bingley and Darcy return to the area; Bingley proposes marriage to Jane, and this news starts rumours that Darcy will propose to Elizabeth, prompting Lady Catherine to confront Elizabeth and imperiously demand that she never accept such a proposal. Elizabeth's refusal to bow to Lady Catherine's demands convinces Darcy that her opinion towards him has changed, and he once again proposes marriage. Elizabeth, by now in love with Mr. Darcy as well, accepts, and the two are engaged. In the epilogue, the fates of the characters are more or less revealed. Elizabeth and Darcy have settled in Pemberly; Mr. Bennet misses his second daughter greatly and visits Pemberly often. Mrs. Bennet is still as frivolous and silly as always, and she loves visiting the new Mrs. Bingley and talking of the new Mrs. Darcy. Later, Jane and Bingley move from Netherfield to avoid Jane's mother and Meryton relations and to locate near the Darcys in Derbyshire. Elizabeth and Jane manage to lead Kitty down a more sensible path, and Mary learns to accept the difference between herself and her sisters' beauty and mixes more with the outside world. Lydia and Wickham are always moving, leaving their debts to Jane and Elizabeth to pay off every time. Lydia and Wickham frequently come to visit and stay at their sisters' estates in Derbyshire. This annoys even Bingley who begins to talk about dropping hints to their leaving as soon as possible. In Pemberly, Elizabeth and Georgina grow exceedingly close, though Georgina is surprised at the playful manner which Elizabeth talks to Darcy with. Lady Catherine is still very angry with her nephew's marriage but overtime the relationship between the two is repaired and she even eventually decides to wait on them at Permberly. Elizabeth and Darcy are also often visited by the Gardiners, and the Darcys are exceedingly thankful to them for bringing them together.

These special, condensed novels are intended for English speakers to learn Arabic, by reading side by side versions of these simplified famous novels.

Product Reviews for Pride and Prejudice : English and Arabic : Facing Page Format (Jane Austen)

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